Perennial leeks for the subtropical garden

From twelve little ‘leeklets’ planted two years ago, I now grow our year-worth supply of leek for our family.

093Unlike annual leek that are slow growing, grown from seeds and intolerant of subtropical heat, perennial leek grows a bit smaller and thinner, with more green than white part, and they remain unfazed by our summer heat.

I planted them in rich moist soil, enriched with mushroom compost and worm wee.

To harvest, pull one fat leek out of the ground, cut one to two inches above the root line, trim the roots and plant that back into the ground. Sure enough, it will give you another leek in a few months and many leeklets too.

Another way to propagate them is by carefully separating the small leeklets that grow out from the ‘mother’ leek. Make sure it comes with some roots and plant that in the garden.

Find me at Music in the Park / Dooralong Produce Swap to know more about this plant, or contact me at question@terrapermaculture.com if you want some leeklets to plant in your garden ($4 for two leeklets).

Happy Spring gardening!

Previously published in The Rural Grapevine Oct 2016

 

 


It is not too late to register to Garden to Table’s Residential Permaculture Course held with John Champagne, Megan Cooke and myself in Pacific Palms, NSW – 19 November to 1 December 2016

 

4 thoughts on “Perennial leeks for the subtropical garden

Contact us

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s