Ancient technique to save your Summer garden

Summer can be a deal-breaker when it comes to growing moisture loving seedlings and plants. Unless you have a reticulated drip-irrigation system –which I don’t have, you need to water the veggies quite often to expect a decent harvest. Often that means those fragile seedlings get damping off problems or mildew when you sprinkle water over them.

For centuries dry-climate gardeners have made unglazed clay pots for irrigation. They’re called Ollas.  Modern manufacturers still make them but the price of each can be quite prohibitive if your garden on a shoe-string or have a large patch.

These clay pots provide a slow release of water underground. As the roots grow, they wrap around the pot allowing the plant to take almost all the water. If the surrounding ground is well mulched, then evaporation is greatly limited.

ollas from op shopsI collect from op shops unglazed clay wine coolers that I bury up to their rim into my garden beds and add water for slow release. I then plant the seedlings around them and voilà!

Now, bees and other insects can drown in that water body so you’re best capping the top of these clay pots with a saucer, or put a stick in them so they have a chance to climb out.

Each cost me up to $5 each, and can be reused almost indefinitely.

PS: find me at Dooralong Produce Swap when Music in the Park is on the 2nd Sunday of each month and bring your produce (or clay pots!) to swap!


It is not too late to register to Garden to Table’s Residential Permaculture Course held with John Champagne, Megan Cooke and myself in Pacific Palms, NSW – 19 November to 1 December 2016

PDC Jilliby 2016

We kick-started our part-time PDC last week, hugging close to our outdoor stove and wrapped in blankets (the sun was a tad shy!).

Right here on our farm, there is a large multi-purpose carport that, in true permaculture spirit, fulfills many functions. And one of them is to host our class.

 

There are also many acres of landscape that, over the course of the next few weeks, will help gel in our knowledge about everything we need to know to design in permaculture: pattern reading, forests, permaculture principles, microclimates, plants, weeds, animals and of course, last but not least, design methods.

 

Last but not least, Permaculture is not an armchair study. It is about actively observing, deducting, designing, planning and finally doing. So every day we get our hands dirty! Worm farming, double-digging, seed sharing, plant propagation…

I am stoked to be able to lead another group of fabulous people into their permaculture journey… follow us as we continue this journey.


It is not too late to register to Garden to Table’s Residential Permaculture Course held with John Champagne, Megan Cooke and myself in Pacific Palms, NSW – 19 November to 1 December 2016

 

Design from patterns to details

We come from families of farmers and gardeners and they are, like everybody else, growing old.

They’ve always managed their gardens the same, traditional, way ; carting in wheelbarrow-full of composts and manures to enrich the soil, ploughing with a rotary hoe, planting densely, weeding by hand, etc. The older they’re getting, the lesser the area is cultivated (and the weeds colonize the vacant land), and the more reliant they have become on synthetic fertilizers, slug pellets and weedkiller too. Continue reading “Design from patterns to details”

Mid-winter harvest (and how a permaculture garden survives six weeks of neglect)

We’re back from a long trip and I come home to a garden that is pumping food (and some weeds too!). During that time we’ve been away, I believe the garden survived on its own, fed by the diverse organic matter and soil biota which I have lovingly helped establish and by the occasional rain. Continue reading “Mid-winter harvest (and how a permaculture garden survives six weeks of neglect)”

We think, therefore we eat

A major ingredient in simple living is mindfulness… this means to pay attention, to engage our mind, to be aware, switched-on, to think and deduce. It also means to make informed choices, and sometimes to accept some compromises.

When it comes to eating, we’ve now come to doing it robotically, without thinking. We blindly believe that the manufacturer cares for our health and well-being and we stop being aware. Nineteen century French gastronome Brillat-Savarin once wrote “tell me what you eat and I will tell you who you are.” How relevant is this now that we buy our food in a pre-packaged form, ready-to-eat, imported, adulterated and fake! Continue reading “We think, therefore we eat”

Settling into Autumn

Here is a collection of pictures taken today…


See you at one of our courses to learn more about permaculture design, forest gardening or simply to hang out in our beautiful little valley!

Enrolling now

Teaching in a relaxed atmosphere
Learning Permaculture in a relaxed atmosphere

We’re now accepting registrations for our annual part-time Permaculture Design Course (PDC).

This course is part-time, meaning it takes place every Saturday (except during school holidays) from 9am to 5pm, starting Saturday 6 August 2016, ending Saturday 12 November 2016. Continue reading “Enrolling now”